Popular Culture Collectibles Reviews

Tuesday, November 22, 2016

Paranormal, Smoke and Vegetable

“Everything you know is wrong!”

You just think you know the paranormal.  Ghosts, UFOs, hauntings, psychics, poltergeists, life after death and all the other unexplained phenomenon that human beings have been searching for answers to may not be what they seem.

That’s what father and son paranormal investigators Paul and Ben Eno explore in their new book from Schiffer Books: ‘Behind The Paranormal-Everything You Know Is Wrong.'

Get ready to get your brain in a tangle as they investigate ancient texts, places of paranormal activity, strange and mysterious powers and occurrences and more as they discover the truth behind the paranormal myths.

The Ghostbusters would be proud!

I love trains of al types, steam, diesel, electric, passenger, cargo, commuter-it doesn’t matter they type of train, it’s the fact that they are trains.

In “Smoke Over Steamtown’ photographer Dennis A. Livesey offers readers a first class passenger seats aboard a wide variety of steam powered trains.

Join him as he explores the trains from the engines to the cabooses, talks to train engineers, conductors, workers and passengers and listens to their stories about their love of steam trains.

History comes alive as black and white and full-color photographs capture every detail of these magnificent trains and the passengers and crews.

Relive a bygone era when steam trains ruled the tracks.

Vegetables.  Parents love them and kids hate them.  Vegetables are a part of our everyday lives.  We boil them, steam them, roast them, sautĂ© them, broil, bake and grill them.

We have them with meat, poultry, fish and meats of all types.  Some are even used as desserts.  They nourish us, provide a livelihood to some and fascinate us.

They are advertised everywhere from print to TV.  We see them in commercials, on billboards, magazines and even hear clever jingles about them on the radio.

In ‘The Graphic Vegetable Food And Art From America’s Soil’ authors Michael B. Emery and Irwin Richman look back on how vegetables have inspired artists to portray them in advertisements, photographs, pop culture items, textbooks, product labels and Americana.

So sit back, pull-up a chair, get your plate and palette ready as the authors serves a hearty helping of vegetables for your literary enjoyment.

As my Mom always told me, “Vegetables are good for you.”